Yehliu Geopark and confusions on names in Taiwan

DSC_6512April 2015, Taiwan

This spring we went to Keelung. Or Geelung, as I thought it was to be pronounced. Taiwan is so confusing: most of the cities have names that doesn’t help you to know how to actually say the name. Taipei is to be read as “Taibei”, Kaohsiung becomes “Gaoxiong”, and Hsinchu is actually Xinzhu. Now when reading Wikipedia I realize that the name of Keelung is actually to be read “Jīlóng“. Even though older written names like Chi-lung still seems to be around. Conclusion: Does writing Chinese with Latin alphabet really has to be this complex? 

Keelung is a city on the north tip on Taiwan, a small distance from the city you can find Yehliu Geopark.

DSC_6522The Geopark of Yehliu is famous for stone formations. The geological conditions made the soft stones shaped by weather and wind, and looking like all kinds of funny figures. Above you can see the “tofu” stones, and below one of the higher structures.

The most famous (and crowded are) was at “the queens head”. Once upon the time the stone might have looked like a proud females head. But today the surface of the stone has lost so much the head is almost unrecognizable. Nature is creating it’s own live art, under constant reconstruction.

DSC_6600As always I feel an urge to get out from the tourist crowds, so we directly headed over to the more distant park of the Geopark.

DSC_6531The peninsula of the park was high and pointy, and offered a beautiful view of the sea around us.

DSC_6525A beautiful bird with a very distinct song was in charge of the soundtrack.

DSC_6519We did not really know where the path was taking us, we just kept walking higher and more far away. But when we reached the end point it was like someone had planned it perfectly for us: we got to a small pavilion just to enjoy a dramatic sunset. Can you see the man finishing on (the second picture) below?

DSC_6580DSC_6561DSC_6589When it started to get dark we walked back down to sea level. We found the previous crowded parts of the park almost deserted, and could take our time looking at the previous-queen of stone.

DSC_6615

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Yehliu Geopark and confusions on names in Taiwan

  1. There are at least three different systems floating around: Wade-Giles (which was once an official system), tongyong pinyin (another past official system), and hanyu pinyin (the current official system). Some place names have retained their original or historical romanization, rather than changing with the different official systems. Some romanizations may not even be based on the Mandarin pronunciation. Tamsui is based on the Taiwanese pronunciation. Ketagalan Boulevard in Taipei is named in honor of the Ketagalan aboriginal tribe that originally lived in the area we now know as Taipei. Ketagalan is the romanized name for the tribe from the Ketagalan language. The Chinese pronunciation of the name is different.

  2. i couldn’t put how amazing i felt in words. i renewed my childhood during this journey.Coming the same place but with my own ability means huge to me, also gave a whole definition with memorable footnotes~, thanks for accompanying~

Write a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s